Tag Archives: Virtual Reality

Microsoft’s Vision for Mixed and Mixing Realities

A couple of days ago the RoadtoVR website posted about Microsoft’s parent for a wand like controller which appeared in the concept video above. I thought it was worth re-posting the video here as it provides a good indication of what a mixed reality future might look like. In particular it considers a future where augmented and virtual reality systems are used side by side. Where some companies firmly backed one platform or the other, VR in the case of Oculus and the HTC Vive, AR in the case of Meta, more established companies like Microsoft and Google have the resources and brand penetration to back both. Whether Apple follows suite or commits everything to AR following the recent release of ARKit remains to be seen. As such it is interesting to compare the kind of mixed reality ecosystems they want to create. Its then up to developers and consumers to determine which hardware, and by extension which vision, they are most inclined to back.

There are many challenges to overcome before this kind of mixed reality interaction becomes possible. The situated use of AR by the character Penny, and use of VR for telepresence by Samir are particularly well motivated. But what are the characters Samir and Chi actually going to see in this interaction? Will it make a difference if they don’t experience each other’s presence to the same degree? And, how is Samir’s position going to be referenced relative to Penny’s? There are many technical challenges still to be overcome, and compromises will need to be made. For companies like Microsoft and Google the challenge for them is in convincing developers and consumers that the hardware ecosystem they are providing is sufficiently close to their vision of that mixed reality future today…and crucially all at the right price.

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NXT BLD: Emerging Design Technology for the Built Environment

NXT BLD is a new conference in London specifically aimed at the discussion on emerging technologies and their applications in the fields of architecture, engineering and construction. Organised by AEC Magazine, the first event was held in the British Museum on the 28th of June 2017. Videos of the event presentations have been released and provide some useful insight into the ways in which technologies like VR are being used within industry. I found the following talk by Dan Harper, managing director of CityScape Digital, particularly useful:

In the video Dan discusses the motivation for their use of VR. Focused on architectural visualisation the company often found that the high quality renderings they were producing quickly became outdated due to the fact that render times were not keeping pace with the iterative nature of the design process. They found that the real time rendering capabilities of game engines, in their case Unreal, helped them iterate images more quickly. Encountering similar challenges with the production of 3D models they realised that having clients inspect the 3D model could be used not only for communication but also as a spatial decision making tool. Supported by 3D data, real-time rendering and VR, which provides a one to one scale experience of the space, value can be added and costs saved by placing a group of decision makers within the space they are discussing rather than relying on the personal impressions each would draw from their own subjective imagining  based on 2D plans and architectural renderings.

Innovation of the design process with VR not only makes it less expensive but also makes the product more valuable. With reference to similar uses of VR in the car industry Dan identifies opportunities for ‘personalisation’, ‘build to order’, ‘collaboration’, ‘focus grouping’ experientially, ‘efficient construction’ and ‘driving margins at point of sale’. Case studies include the Sky Broadcasting Campus at Osterley, the Battersea Power Station redevelopment and the Earls Court masterplan. These use cases demonstrate that return on investment is increased through reuse of the 3D models and assets in successive stages of the project from concept design, investor briefings, stakeholders consultation right through to marketing.

Videos of the other presentations from the day can be found on the NXT BLD website here.

ViLo: The Virtual London Platform by CASA in VR

This is the third post of the week looking at CASA’s urban data visualisation platform ViLo. Today we are looking at the virtual reality integration with HTC Vive:

Using Virtual Reality technologies such as the HTC Vive we can create data rich virtual environments in which users can freely interact with digital representations of urban spaces. In this demonstration we invite users to enter a virtual representation of the ArcelorMittal Orbit tower, a landmark tower located in the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park. Using CASA’s Virtual London Platform ViLo it is possible to recursively embed 3D models of the surrounding district within that scene. These models can be digitally coupled to the actual locations they represent through the incorporation of real-time data feeds. In this way events occurring in the actual environment, the arrival and departure of buses and trains for example, are immediately represented within the virtual environment in real-time.

Virtual Reality is a technology which typically uses a head mounted display to immerse the user in a three dimensional, computer generated environment, regularly referred to as a ‘virtual environment’. In this case the virtual environment is a recreation of the viewing gallery at the top of the ArcelorMittal Orbit tower, situated at the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in East London. CASA’s ViLo platform is then used to embed further interactive 3D models and data visualisations within that virtual environment.

Using the HTC Vive’s room scale tracking the user can freely walk between exhibits. Otherwise they can teleport between them by pointing and clicking at a spot on the floor with one of the Vive hand controllers. The other hand controller is used for interacting with the exhibits, either by pointing and clicking with the trigger button, or placing the controller over objects and using the grip buttons on the side of the controller to hold them.

In the video we see how the virtual environment can be used to present a range of different media. Visitors can watch 360 degree videos and high quality architectural visualisations, but they can also interact with the 3D models featured in that content more actively using virtual tools like the cross-sectional plane seen in the video.

The ViLo platform provides further flexibility by enabling us to import interactive models of entire urban environments. The Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park is visualised with different layers of data provided by live feeds from Transport for London’s bus, tube, and bike hire APIs. Different layers are selected and removed here by the placing of 3D icons on a panel. Virtual reality affords the user the ability to choose their own view point on the data by simply moving their head. Other contextual information like images from Flickr or articles from Wikipedia can also be imported.

A further feature is the ability to quickly swap between models of different location. In the final section of the video another model of the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park can be immediately replaced by a model of the area of the Thames in Central London between St Paul’s Cathedral and the Tate Modern gallery. The same tools can be used to manipulate either model. Analysis of building footprint size and building use data are combined with real-time visibility analysis depicting viewsheds from any point the user designates. Wikipedia and Flickr are queried dynamically to provide additional information and context for particular buildings by simply pointing and clicking. In this way many different aspects of urban environments can be digitally reconstructed within the virtual environment, either in miniature or at 1:1 scale.

Where the version of ViLo powered by the ARKit we looked at yesterday provided portability, the virtual reality experience facilitated by the HTC Vive integration can incorporate a much wider variety of data with a far richer level of interaction. Pure data visualisation tasks may not benefit greatly from immersion or presence provided by virtual reality. However, as we see with new creative applications like Google’s Tilt Brush and Blocks, virtual reality really shines in cases where natural and precise interaction is required in the manipulation of virtual objects. Virtual environments also provide useful sites for users who can’t be in the same physical location at the same time. Networked telepresence can be used to enable professionals in different cities to work together synchronously. Alternatively virtual environments can provide forums for public engagement where potential users can drop in at their convenience. Leveraging an urban data visualisation platform like CASA’s ViLo virtual environments can become useful sites for experimentation and communication of built environment interventions.

Many thanks to CASA Research Assistants Lyzette Zeno Cortes and Valerio Signorelli for their work on the ViLo virtual reality integration discussed here. Tweet @ValeSignorelli for more information about the HTC Vive integration.

For further details about ViLo see Monday’s post ViLo: The Virtual London Platform by CASA for Desktop and yesterday’s post ViLo: The Virtual London Platform by CASA with ARKit.

Credits

The Bartlett Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis (CASA)

Project Supervisor – Professor Andrew Hudson-Smith
Backend Development – Gareth Simons
Design and Visualisation – Lyzette Zeno Cortes
VR, AR and Mixed Reality Interaction – Valerio Signorelli / Kostas Cheliotis / Oliver Dawkins
Additional Coding – Jascha Grübel

Developed in collaboration with The Future Cities Catapult (FCC)

Thanks to the London Legacy Development Corporation and Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park for their cooperation with the project.

Point Cloud Gaming: Scanner Sombre in VR

Scanner Sombre is an exploration game which places the player in the depths of a pitch black cave system with nothing to guide them except an experimental headset and LiDAR like sensor enabling them to see in the dark. I first saw Scanner Sombre back in April at the EGZ Rezzed computer game trade fair. I immediately fell in love with the beautiful visual style which renders the environment as a point cloud. The visual style links cleverly to the central game mechanic by which the points representing the contours of the cave walls only appear through the player’s use of the scanning device, providing an eerily partial view of the environment.

Following the initial release for desktop PC in April the game’s makers Introversion Software have just released a new VR version, now available on Steam for both Oculus Rift and HTC Vive. Having played the two I’d argue that players really have to try Scanner Sombre in VR to get the most out of the experience. Producer Mark Morris and designer Chris Delay touch on this in the following video which discusses the the process of transferring the desktop game to VR and the differences between the two. They also provide a very frank discussion of the factors contributing to the game’s poor sales relative to the runaway success of their earlier runaway success with Prison Architect.

One area that Mark and Chris discuss at length is narrative. The difficulty they discuss is providing the player sufficient motivation to play, and the pressure they felt to fit a narrative to the experience part way through development. At the same time they are uncertain that a more developed narrative would have added anything. I’d tend to agree. The unusual visual style and game mechanic have a niche feel which some players will love and some will hate. I love the VR version of the game but I could see others might feel it is more of an extended demo.

While Scanner Sombre has not met the designer’s expectations for sales I’ve found it a really enjoyable and atmospheric experience, particularly with the heightened sense of immersion provided by VR. If you’re interested in giving it a go you can currently pick it up for less that a fiver on Steam here.

One Man Game Jam: HTC Vive Basketball

HTC Vive BasketballLast week CASA finally received the HTC Vive. Everyone in the office had great fun exploring Valve’s demo experience The Lab. During the week the Longbow emerged as a particular favourite and caused several of us to discuss which sports might work in VR as viable training simulations. Wanting to get to grips with the HTC Vive hand controllers I decided to take up the challenge by creating a basketball simulation for the Vive in Unity.

I started by downloading a SketchUp model of a basketball court from the 3D warehouse. The model had no walls and a lot of reversed faces so I quickly fixed it up in SketchUp with the aid of the S4U Material plugin, ThomThom’s Material Tools and ThomThom’s excellent CleanUp³ plugin. I also obtained a royalty free basketball model from TurboSquid.

Basketball Court SketchUp

As the Unity importer for SketchUp had failed last time I used it I exported the model from SketchUp in Collada format, and converted it to FBX out of habit using the Autodesk FBX converter. After importing the models into Unity I downloaded the SteamVR plugin and added the CameraRig prefab to my scene to handle the basic Vive interaction.

Basketball Court Unity

Trigger colliders were placed in the basketball hoops with a C# script attached to count the score. The Steam scripts for TestThrow and Teleporter were then added to the hand controllers and modified to enable the player to navigate the entire basketball court and to spawn and throw the ball. The ball physics were handled with a simple Unity physics material which was surprisingly effective.

Using the Vive hand controller works well with two qualifications: Firstly it isn’t possible to apply back spin to the ball; secondly there is a high risk of throwing the hand controller out of the window. Risk of breakage in injury aside the final game is really challenging but great fun. I thought I’d actually got the drop on Basketball games in VR but it looks like HelloVR are adding a basketball experience to their social VR platform Metaworld. Could be fun!

Virtual Architectures at the QEOP Smart Park Demonstrator

From Saturday 13th of February to Sunday 21st February the London Legacy Development Corporation (LLDC) held a 9 day ‘Smart Park’ demonstrator event at the ArcelorMittal Orbit tower on the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park. Exhibits were provided by The Bartlett Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis (CASA) and the UCL Interaction Centre (UCLIC).

As the event was held during school half-term the exhibits were specifically aimed to engage youngsters. My contribution on behalf of CASA was an immersive virtual reality fly-through of a 3D model of the Olympic Park created using CityEngine and Unity with the Ordnance Survey’s MasterMap and Building Height data. In order to capture the imagination of visitors the tour was presented as a magic carpet ride. The Oculus Rift virtual reality headset was used to provide the sense of immersion while a specially prepared soundtrack and an electric fan were used to heighten the impression of flight by simulating rushing wind.

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During the course of the week the event was attended by over 1500 local, national and international visitors. In this way we were able to engage the public with the Olympic Park’s work to create a data rich 3D model of the park for the purpose of ‘smart’ day to day management and planning of the park. This also served as an opportunity for a gentle introduction to my own research into the use of augmented and virtual reality technologies for the purpose of providing spatial intelligence and facilitating real time decision making in a fun and engaging way. Further work will focus on the use of the LLDC’s 3D model of the park and various emerging interaction technologies as a means for interfacing with the site’s underlying operational data infrastructure.

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Also exhibiting on behalf of CASA was Sharon Richardson who is conducting research into sensing and evoking behavioural change in urban spaces through dynamic data sources and the Internet of Things. Sharon’s exhibit used a web cam and computer vision to sense the emotional state of visitors and present it back to them as a visualisation in real time. Going forward Sharon hopes to take control of the Park’s fountains to visualise the emotional state of the park.

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UCLIC’s contributions included their VoxBox and a robot Roam.io. Developed in partnership with the Intel Collaborative Research Institute (ICRI) these provide novel and engaging interfaces for ‘soft sensing’ of visitor opinions.

Jointly these ongoing collaborations will investigate and contribute to aspects of the LLDC’s participation in a pan-European programme for Smart Sustainable Districts (SSD) which focuses on four primary areas of the park’s daily operation:

  • Resource Efficient Buildings – Focusing initially on the iconic London Aquatics Centre and Copper Box Arena, this workstream will create tools and approaches to enable low cost, low energy, low environmental impact management and maintenance of future ready non-domestic buildings.
  • Energy Systems – The energy systems workstream will create an efficient, smart, low carbon, resilient energy ecosystem, with specific focal points including optimisation of district energy systems, community engagement and benefits and increased renewable energy generation.
  • Smart Park / Future Living – Implementing user facing digital and data solutions that deliver financial and CO2 efficiencies and prioritise quality of life improvements for those who live, work and visit the Park.
  • These are all underpinned by the fourth workstream, Data Architecture and Management – Implementing efficient and robust data management solutions that support the identification and trialling of innovative solutions and provide the foundation for improved Park operations, user experience and approaches that can be replicated by others, including through the London Data Store.

The SSD project is overseen by Climate-KIC, one of three Knowledge and Innovation Communities created in 2010 by the European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT).

Our thanks to the LLDC and the management of ArcelorMittal Orbit for a fun and eventful week!

Images courtesy of Twitter user Ben Edmonds @benjaminpeter77.

Stress Relief in VR for Urban Planners?

Couldn’t resist sharing this video for a new City Destruction prototype for HTC Vive developed by Canadian games company AlienTrap. Using the Vive controllers you can swing a wrecking ball at the environment or pick up vehicles and other objects to launch around the scene.

I wondered if this might be perfect stress relief for town planners. It would be great to see this in a larger scale environment with networked play. Sad to see the characters in the scene getting turned into little red splodges though. Maybe they’ll learn to fight back if the demo gets released.

The scoop on this came via Road to VR.