Tag Archives: Project Tango

Urban X-Rays: Wi-Fi for Spatial Scanning

Many of us in cities increasingly depend on Wi-Fi connectivity for communication as we go about our every day lives. However, beyond providing for our mobile and wireless communication needs, the intentional or directed use of Wi-Fi also provides new possibilities for urban sensing.

In this video professor Yasamin Mostofi from the University of California discusses research into the scanning or x-ray of built structures using a combination of drones and Wi-Fi transceivers. By transmitting a Wi-Fi signal from a drone on one side of a structure, and using a drone on the opposite side to receive and measure the strength of that signal it is possible to build up a 3D image of the structure and its contents. This methodology has great potential in areas like structural monitoring for the built environment, archaeological surveying, and even emergency response as outlined on the 3D Through-Wall Imaging project page.

Particularly with regard to emergency response one can easily imagine the value of being able to identify people trapped or hiding within a structure. Indeed Mostofi’s group are have also researched the potential these techniques provide for monitoring of humans in their Head Counting with WiFI project as demonstrated with the next video.

What is striking is that this technique enables individuals to be counted without themselves needing a Wi-Fi enabled device. Several potential uses are proposed which are particularly relevant to urban environments:

For instance, heating and cooling of a building can be better optimized based on learning the concentration of the people over the building. Emergency evacuation can also benefit from an estimation of the level of occupancy. Finally, stores can benefit from counting the number of shoppers for better business planning.

Given that WiFi networks are available in many buildings, we envision that they can provide a new way for occupancy estimation, in addition to cameras and other sensing mechanisms. In particular, its potential for counting behind walls can be a nice complement to existing vision-based methods.

I’m fascinated by the way experiments like this reveal the hidden potentials already latent within many of our cities. The roll out of citywide Wi-Fi infrastructure provides the material support for an otherwise invisible electromagnetic environment designers Dunne & Raby have called ‘Hertzian Space’. By finding new ways to sense the dynamics of this space, cities can tap in to these resources and exploit new potentialities, hopefully for the benefit of both the city and its inhabitants.

Thanks to Geo Awesomeness for posting the drone story here.

Google Project Tango

Project Tango

Back in the summer Virtual Architectures signed up to go on the waiting list for Google’s Project Tango development kit. The current 7″ development kits are powered by the NVIDIA Tegra K1 processor and have 4GB of RAM, 128GB of storage, motion tracking camera, integrated depth sensing, WiFi, BTLE, and 4G LTE for wireless and mobile connectivity. Due to other exciting developments for Virtual Architectures we haven’t been able to take up the offer at this time. However, its such an exciting project we can’t resist sharing the details from the Project Tango website:

What is Project Tango?

As we walk through our daily lives, we use visual cues to navigate and understand the world around us. We observe the size and shape of objects and rooms, and we learn their position and layout almost effortlessly over time. This awareness of space and motion is fundamental to the way we interact with our environment and each other. We are physical beings that live in a 3D world. Yet, our mobile devices assume that physical world ends at the boundaries of the screen.

The goal of Project Tango is to give mobile devices a human-scale understanding of space and motion.

– Johnny Lee and the ATAP-Project Tango Team

3D motion and depth sensing

Project Tango devices contain customized hardware and software designed to track the full 3D motion of the device, while simultaneously creating a map of the environment. These sensors allow the device to make over a quarter million 3D measurements every second, updating its position and orientation in real-time, combining that data into a single 3D model of the space around you.

What could I do with it?

What if you could capture the dimensions of your home simply by walking around with your phone before you went furniture shopping? What if directions to a new location didn’t stop at the street address? What if you never again found yourself lost in a new building? What if the visually-impaired could navigate unassisted in unfamiliar indoor places? What if you could search for a product and see where the exact shelf is located in a super-store?

Imagine playing hide-and-seek in your house with your favorite game character, or transforming the hallways into a tree-lined path. Imagine competing against a friend for control over territories in your home with your own miniature army, or hiding secret virtual treasures in physical places around the world?

The Project Tango development kit provides excellent opportunities for new developments in architectural visualisation, Augmented Reality and games. It is also exciting to know that there is an integration with the Unity game engine. We look forward to seeing what developers come up with.