Tag Archives: Platform

ViLo: The Virtual London Platform by CASA for Desktop

 

This is the first of three posts introducing CASA’s interactive urban data visualisation platform, ViLo. The platform enables visualisation of both real-time and offline spatio-temporal data sets in a digital, three-dimensional representation of the urban environment. I’ve been fortunate to work alongside the team and learn from them as the project has developed. Initially conceived as a desktop application CASA are now working on integrations for a range of different interaction devices including virtual reality with the HTC Vive and Google Daydream, augmented reality with Google’s Project Tango and Apple’s ARKit, and so called mixed realities with Microsoft’s HoloLens. ViLo forms the basis for these experiments. Underlying each of these projects is the ViLo platform.

ViLo is an interactive urban data visualisation platform developed by The Bartlett Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis (CASA) at UCL in collaboration with the Future Cities Catapult (FCC). The platform enables visualisation of both real-time and offline spatio-temporal data sets in a digital, three-dimensional representation of the urban environment. The platform uses both OpenStreetMap data and the MapBox API for the creation of the digital environment. The platform enables us to visualise the precise locations of buildings, trees and various other urban amenities on a high resolution digital terrain model. The buildings, which are generated at runtime from OpenStreetMap data, retain their original identifiers so that they can be queried for semantic descriptions of their properties. ViLo can also visualise custom spatio-temporal data sets provided by the user in various file formats. Custom 3D models can be provided for landmarks and it is possible to switch from the OpenStreetMap generated geometries to a higher detailed CityGML model of the district in LoD2.

Dynamic data sets stored in CSV file format can also be visualised alongside real-time feeds. A specific emphasis has been placed on the visualisation of mobility data sets. Using Transport for London’s APIs ViLo has the capability to retrieve and visualise the location of bike sharing docks and the availability of bikes along with the entire bus and tube networks including the locations of bus stops and tube stations along with the position of buses and trains updated in real-time.

The ViLo platform also integrates real-time weather information from Wunderground’s API, a three dimensional visualisation of Flickr photos relating to points of interest, and a walking route planner for predefined locations using MapBox API.

An innovative aspect of the ViLo project is the possibility of conducting real time urban analysis using the various data sets loaded into the digital environment. At the current stage it is possible to conduct two-dimensional and three-dimensional visibility analysis (intervisibility; area and perimeter of the visible surfaces; maximum, minimum and average distance; compactness, convexity and concavity).

While originally conceived as part of an effort to visualise London in 3D, The ViLo platform can be used to visualise any urban area across the globe. The first version of the platform demonstrated here focuses on visualising the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in East London, a new district that was purpose built to host the London Summer Olympics and Paralympics in 2012.

Credits

The Bartlett Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis (CASA)

Project Supervisor – Professor Andrew Hudson-Smith
Backend Development – Gareth Simons
Design and Visualisation – Lyzette Zeno Cortes
VR, AR and Mixed Reality Interaction – Valerio Signorelli / Kostas Cheliotis / Oliver Dawkins
Additional Coding – Jascha Grübel

Developed in collaboration with The Future Cities Catapult (FCC)

From a purely aesthetic point of view the design of the desktop application reminds me strongly of the image from the Guide for visitors to Ise Shrine, Japan, 1948–54 that visualisation expert Edward Tufte discussed particularly favourably in his book Envisioning Information (1990). Our current efforts at ‘escaping flatland’ are a continuation of previous work undertaken by Andy Hudson-Smith and Mike Batty at CASA in the early 2000’s to create a Virtual London.

One of the main advances is our increased ability to integrate real-time data in such a way that the digital representation can be more fully coupled to the actual environment in order to reflect change. We also benefit from advances in 3D visualisation and real-time rendering afforded by the use of video game engines such as Unity. As a result the ViLo platform provides a good demonstration of our current capabilities in relation to the observation of dynamic processes as they occur in real-time at an urban scale.