Tag Archives: HoloLens

Microsoft’s Vision for Mixed and Mixing Realities

A couple of days ago the RoadtoVR website posted about Microsoft’s parent for a wand like controller which appeared in the concept video above. I thought it was worth re-posting the video here as it provides a good indication of what a mixed reality future might look like. In particular it considers a future where augmented and virtual reality systems are used side by side. Where some companies firmly backed one platform or the other, VR in the case of Oculus and the HTC Vive, AR in the case of Meta, more established companies like Microsoft and Google have the resources and brand penetration to back both. Whether Apple follows suite or commits everything to AR following the recent release of ARKit remains to be seen. As such it is interesting to compare the kind of mixed reality ecosystems they want to create. Its then up to developers and consumers to determine which hardware, and by extension which vision, they are most inclined to back.

There are many challenges to overcome before this kind of mixed reality interaction becomes possible. The situated use of AR by the character Penny, and use of VR for telepresence by Samir are particularly well motivated. But what are the characters Samir and Chi actually going to see in this interaction? Will it make a difference if they don’t experience each other’s presence to the same degree? And, how is Samir’s position going to be referenced relative to Penny’s? There are many technical challenges still to be overcome, and compromises will need to be made. For companies like Microsoft and Google the challenge for them is in convincing developers and consumers that the hardware ecosystem they are providing is sufficiently close to their vision of that mixed reality future today…and crucially all at the right price.

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Microsoft HoloLens: Hands On!

It’s taken a while but I finally had my first hands on look at Microsoft HoloLens last night. The demonstration was given as part of the London Unity Usergroup (LUUG) meetup a talk by Jerome Maurey-Delaunay of Neutral Digital about their initial experiences of building demos for the device with Unity. Neutral are a design and software consultancy who have a portfolio of projects including work with cultural institutions such as the Tate and V&A, engineering and aviation firms like Airbus, and architectural firms such as Zaha Hadid architects who they are currently assisting to develop Virtual Reality visualisation workflows.

During the break following the presentation I had may first chance to try the device out for myself.  One of the great features of HoloLens is that it incorporates video capture straight out of the box. Although clips weren’t taken on the night these videos from the Neutral Digital twitter stream provide a good indication of my experience when I tested it:

After using VR headsets like the Oculus Rift and HTC Vive the first thing you notice about the HoloLens is how unencumbered you feel. Where VR headsets enclose the user’s face to block out ambient light and heighten immersion in a virtual environment, the HoloLens is open affording the user unhindered awareness of their surrounding [augmented] environment over which the virtual objects or ‘holograms’ are projected. The second thing you notice is that the HoloLens runs without a tether. Once applications have been transferred to the device it can be unplugged leaving the user free to move about without worrying about tripping up or garroting themselves.

Being able to see my surroundings also meant that I could easily talk face to face with Jerome and see the gestures he wanted me to perform in order operate the device and manipulate the virtual objects it projected. Tapping forefinger and thumb visualised the otherwise invisible virtual mesh that the HoloLens draws as a reference to anchor holograms to the users environment. A projected aircraft could then be walked around and visualised from any angle. Alternatively holding forefinger and thumb while moving my hand would rotate the object in that direction instead.

Don’t be fooled by the simplicity of these demos. The ability of HoloLens to project animated and interactive Holograms that feel anchored to the user’s environment is impressive. I found the headset comfortable and appreciated being able to see my surroundings and interact easily with the people around me. At the same time I wouldn’t say that I felt immersed in the experience in the sense discussed with reference to virtual reality. The ability to interact through natural gestures helped involve my attention in the virtual objects I was seeing, but the actual field of view available for projection is not as wide as the video captures from the device might suggest.

As it stands I wouldn’t mistake Microsoft’s holograms for ‘real’ objects, but then I’m not convinced that this is what we should be aiming for with AR. While one of the prime virtues of virtual reality technologies like Oculus and Vive is their ability to provide a sense of ‘being there’, I see the strength of augmented reality technologies elsewhere in their potential for visualising complex information at the point of engagement, decision or action.

Kind thanks to Neutral Digital for sharing their videos via Twitter. Thanks also to the London Unity Usergroup meetup for arranging the talks and demo.

Microsoft HoloLens for Architecture and Civil Engineering

Where virtual reality is fantastic for visualising and immersing a user in a scene at a human scale I’ve always felt that augmented reality provided a greater range of options for visualising data at scale. In a bid to bring HoloLens to the wider world of architecture and engineering Microsoft have recently initiated an exciting partnership with the American company Trimble. Trimble primarily work providing hardware, software and services for the provision of locational data to a range of industries including land survey, construction, transportation, telecommunications, utilities and asset tracking and management. I think this partnership offers a fantastic opportunity to demonstrate the potential of HoloLens and augmented reality to work on projects of a larger scale.

 

The most obvious value it provides is helping professionals visualise their data in 3D. In this video Microsoft and Trimble demonstrate how the virtual hologram could be integrated with a traditional physical model to collaboratively visualise and quickly iterate through alternative proposals. The chosen solution can then be visualised on the human scale to verify the proposal. Further than this the video hints at the power of HoloLens to provide crucial data wherever and whenever it is needed during construction, while simultaneously providing the ability to record changes and decisions on the spot. In this way HoloLens and other technologies like it could prove indispensable for urban planning, construction and asset management for the life of a development. Beyond the marketing though it will be fascinating test it to see whether the device can live up to its users’ expectations.