Monthly Archives: September 2017

A/B: Participatory Navigation with Augmented Reality

Imagine navigating the city with an augmented reality app, but where the choice of route is determined by a crowd and the decision floats in front of you like the hallucinations of a broken cyborg. A/B was an experiment in participatory voting, live streaming and augmented reality by Harald Haraldsson. Created for the digital art exhibition 9to5.tv the project allowed an online audience to guide Haraldsson around Chinatown in New York for 42 minutes. This was achieved through a web interface presenting the livestream from an Android Pixel smartphone.

The smartphone was running Haraldsson’s own augmented reality app implemented with the Unity game engine and Google’s ARCore SDK. At key points Haraldsson could use the app to prompt viewers to vote on the direction he should take, either A or B. ARCore enabled the A/B indicators to be spatially referenced to his urban surroundings in 3D so that they appeared to be floating in the city. Various visual effects and distortions were also overlaid or spatially referenced to the scene.

More images and video including a recording of the the full 45 minute can be found on the A/B project page here.

Thanks to Creative Applications for the link.

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ViLo and the Future of Planning

Following our recent posts on CASA’s digital urban visualisation platform ViLo, the Future Cities Catapult who collaborated with CASA on the project have released a video discussing it in further detail. Commencing in 2014 the aim of the project was to identify which combinations of urban data might be most valuable to urban planners, site operators and citizens. CASA research associates Lyzette Zeno Cortes and Valerio Signorelli discuss how it was created using the Unity game engine in order to understand its potential for visualising information in real-time.

Ben Edmonds from the London Legacy Development Corporation who run the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park where ViLo has been tested discusses how this was used to gather environmental data and qualitative data from park visitors in order to help understand and improve their experience of the park. Including real-time information on transportation links, environmental factors and park usage by the public helps to build up an overview of the whole area so that it can be run more effectively.

Beyond this there is an expectation that use of the 3D model can be extended beyond the Olympic Park and implemented London-wide. This fits in to a wider expectation for City Information Modelling (CIM). As Stefan Webb from the Future Cities Catapult describes it, this is the idea that a 3D model containing sufficient data can enable us to forecast the impact of future developments and changes to the functioning of both the physical and social infrastructure of the city.

Digital Literacy in the context of Smart Cities

September 8th is UNESCO’s International Literacy Day. This year the theme is ‘Literacy in a digital world’:

At record speed, digital technologies are fundamentally changing the way people live, work, learn and socialise everywhere. They are giving new possibilities to people to improve all areas of their lives including access to information; knowledge management; networking; social services; industrial production, and mode of work. However, those who lack access to digital technologies and the knowledge, skills and competencies required to navigate them, can end up marginalised in increasingly digitally driven societies. Literacy is one such essential skill.

Just as knowledge, skills and competencies evolve in the digital world, so does what it means to be literate. In order to close the literacy skills gap and reduce inequalities, this year’s International Literacy Day will highlight the challenges and opportunities in promoting literacy in the digital world, a world where, despite progress, at least 750 million adults and 264 million out-of-school children still lack basic literacy skills.

International Literacy Day is celebrated annually worldwide and brings together governments, multi- and bilateral organizations, NGOs, private sectors, communities, teachers, learners and experts in the field. It is an occasion to mark achievements and reflect on ways to counter remaining challenges for the promotion of literacy as an integral part of lifelong learning within and beyond the 2030 Education Agenda.

In the past days I’ve been preparing for a conference talk this weekend and its has become clear to me that digital literacy is of key importance for helping individuals to engage with urban technologies and exercise digital agency. It is through digital literacy that people living in cities will be able to understand and make informed decisions with regard to the use and impact of emerging technologies. Smartphones, the Internet of Things, driverless cars, drones, artificial intelligence and automation can be very daunting and their implications unclear.

A common response to the perceived imposition of digital technologies is to try to disconnect. It is up to the individual to determine to what extent they engage with such technologies. However, ignoring these technologies altogether is no solution. At the very least we have to provide the opportunity for those that are sufficiently capable to be able to inform themselves, enabling them to more effectively assess the advantages and disadvantages of different technologies. We need to move away from the kind of binary thinking that leads to an all or nothing approach to technology. Fostering digital literacy is key for helping individuals and communities negotiate lives that are increasingly mediated by digitally technologies.

At the conference on Monday afternoon I’ll be presenting my paper ‘Opening Urban Mirror Worlds: Possibilities for Participation in Digital Urban Dataspaces’. In this talk I’ll discuss some of the ways in which technologies like virtual and augmented reality might be used to give people access urban data. I’ll also be part of a panel discussing ‘Engagement in the Smart City’. Further details can be found on the conference website: Whose Right To The Smart City.