ViLo: The Virtual London Platform by CASA in VR

This is the third post of the week looking at CASA’s urban data visualisation platform ViLo. Today we are looking at the virtual reality integration with HTC Vive:

Using Virtual Reality technologies such as the HTC Vive we can create data rich virtual environments in which users can freely interact with digital representations of urban spaces. In this demonstration we invite users to enter a virtual representation of the ArcelorMittal Orbit tower, a landmark tower located in the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park. Using CASA’s Virtual London Platform ViLo it is possible to recursively embed 3D models of the surrounding district within that scene. These models can be digitally coupled to the actual locations they represent through the incorporation of real-time data feeds. In this way events occurring in the actual environment, the arrival and departure of buses and trains for example, are immediately represented within the virtual environment in real-time.

Virtual Reality is a technology which typically uses a head mounted display to immerse the user in a three dimensional, computer generated environment, regularly referred to as a ‘virtual environment’. In this case the virtual environment is a recreation of the viewing gallery at the top of the ArcelorMittal Orbit tower, situated at the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in East London. CASA’s ViLo platform is then used to embed further interactive 3D models and data visualisations within that virtual environment.

Using the HTC Vive’s room scale tracking the user can freely walk between exhibits. Otherwise they can teleport between them by pointing and clicking at a spot on the floor with one of the Vive hand controllers. The other hand controller is used for interacting with the exhibits, either by pointing and clicking with the trigger button, or placing the controller over objects and using the grip buttons on the side of the controller to hold them.

In the video we see how the virtual environment can be used to present a range of different media. Visitors can watch 360 degree videos and high quality architectural visualisations, but they can also interact with the 3D models featured in that content more actively using virtual tools like the cross-sectional plane seen in the video.

The ViLo platform provides further flexibility by enabling us to import interactive models of entire urban environments. The Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park is visualised with different layers of data provided by live feeds from Transport for London’s bus, tube, and bike hire APIs. Different layers are selected and removed here by the placing of 3D icons on a panel. Virtual reality affords the user the ability to choose their own view point on the data by simply moving their head. Other contextual information like images from Flickr or articles from Wikipedia can also be imported.

A further feature is the ability to quickly swap between models of different location. In the final section of the video another model of the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park can be immediately replaced by a model of the area of the Thames in Central London between St Paul’s Cathedral and the Tate Modern gallery. The same tools can be used to manipulate either model. Analysis of building footprint size and building use data are combined with real-time visibility analysis depicting viewsheds from any point the user designates. Wikipedia and Flickr are queried dynamically to provide additional information and context for particular buildings by simply pointing and clicking. In this way many different aspects of urban environments can be digitally reconstructed within the virtual environment, either in miniature or at 1:1 scale.

Where the version of ViLo powered by the ARKit we looked at yesterday provided portability, the virtual reality experience facilitated by the HTC Vive integration can incorporate a much wider variety of data with a far richer level of interaction. Pure data visualisation tasks may not benefit greatly from immersion or presence provided by virtual reality. However, as we see with new creative applications like Google’s Tilt Brush and Blocks, virtual reality really shines in cases where natural and precise interaction is required in the manipulation of virtual objects. Virtual environments also provide useful sites for users who can’t be in the same physical location at the same time. Networked telepresence can be used to enable professionals in different cities to work together synchronously. Alternatively virtual environments can provide forums for public engagement where potential users can drop in at their convenience. Leveraging an urban data visualisation platform like CASA’s ViLo virtual environments can become useful sites for experimentation and communication of built environment interventions.

Many thanks to CASA Research Assistants Lyzette Zeno Cortes and Valerio Signorelli for their work on the ViLo virtual reality integration discussed here. Tweet @ValeSignorelli for more information about the HTC Vive integration.

For further details about ViLo see Monday’s post ViLo: The Virtual London Platform by CASA for Desktop and yesterday’s post ViLo: The Virtual London Platform by CASA with ARKit.

Credits

The Bartlett Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis (CASA)

Project Supervisor – Professor Andrew Hudson-Smith
Backend Development – Gareth Simons
Design and Visualisation – Lyzette Zeno Cortes
VR, AR and Mixed Reality Interaction – Valerio Signorelli / Kostas Cheliotis / Oliver Dawkins
Additional Coding – Jascha Grübel

Developed in collaboration with The Future Cities Catapult (FCC)

Thanks to the London Legacy Development Corporation and Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park for their cooperation with the project.

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